Onion


onion-1


Scientific Name: Allium cepa


Indian Names

Bengali Pemyaja
Gujarati Dungali
Hindi Pyaja
Kannada Irulli
Malayalam Ulli, Savola
Marathi Kanda
Punjabi Piaja
Tamil Venkayam
Telugu Ullipaya
Urdu Pyaz

Name in International Languages

Arabic Basal
Chinese Yangcong
Dutch Ui
French Oignon
German Zwiebel
Italian Cipolla
Japanese Tamanegi
Portuguese Cebola
Russian Luk
Spanish Cebolla
Swedish Lok

Description

Onion is a vegetable and the popular common one is the species cepa. It is also called the bulb onion or common onion. The onion plant has a fan of hollow, yellowish-green leaves and the bulb at the base. It is cultivated and used around the world. They are mainly served as cooked but it also eaten raw at different salads. It became one of the unavoidable content in most of the food item.

The onions are pungent when chopped and contain certain chemical substances which irritate the eyes. It also have potential anti-inflammatory, anti-cholesterol, anticancer and antioxidant properties.

The usage may vary from place to place and dishes to dishes. It is largely used as mature onion bulb, but it can be eaten at immature stages. Young plants may be harvested before bulbing occurs and used whole as spring onions or scallions. Other than the use in food, it is also useful in medical and other purposes.


Nutritional Facts

About 89 % of the onion is water, 4 % sugar, and the remaining percentage contains fibre, protein, fat etc. They are a vital source of vitamin C, vitamin B6, folic acid and numerous other nutrients in small amounts. They are rich in calorie and low in fats.


 

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